The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County

By Mark Twain

Welcome All

December 14th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · 1 Comment

Dear Reader,

This website is dedicated to Mark Twain’s “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Cavaleras County” the site may provide you with some info about the story that you might not know. In the post that follow you will see a number of different  types of posts. Some will be answers of questions others will be reactions to to certain ideas, all stemming from course work completed in ENG 170W at Queens College in New York. Twain’s story is packed with historical data  that is densely hidden and humor that can be seen from a mile away a key writing attribute that Twain has been known to have mastered.

( Eng 170W course work: http://eng170w.qwriting.qc.cuny.edu/ )

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Revise My Site

December 7th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · 1 Comment

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Conference Presentation

December 7th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · No Comments

This is now view-able at the top of my Blog if you click “conference presentation”

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The Marriage Plot part 1

December 1st, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · No Comments

A) The Hannas’ house was a hundred-year-old Tudor. . . . Inside, everything was tasteful and half falling apart. The Oriental carpets had stains. The brick-red kitchen linoleum was thirty years old. When Mitchell used the powder room, he saw that the toilet paper dispenser had been repaired with Scotch tape. So had the peeling wallpaper in the hallway. (74)

In the Marriage plot the theme of controlled or uncontrolled chaos is displayed throughout the novel. Closely looking at the first paragraph we see that Eugenides has a particular way of foreshadowing or conveying his theme of mania. The Hannas’ till this point have been described as a successfully family that dressed nice, had money and where very punctual. Eugenides changes our whole perception on who they were and their lifestyle in this one paragraph. He made sure to mention that the home they lived in was a tudor home that was built a hundred years ago, pressing on the idea that that the home just like the Hanna’s had a good foundation and it was well constructed. On the inside “everything was tasteful and half falling apart” thus pressing on his theme of chaos. Like the inside of their home the Hannas’ were not as well put together as they seemed. Madeline for instance just recently woke up with a hangover in her bed that she did not remember returning to clothed in her roommates dress borrowed from the night before that now had a suspicious white stain on it,(chaotic). He also tells us that the “brick kitchen linoleum was thirty years old” brick is usually tough and strong, thinking of the kitchen as the family , he lays out to us that the brick or the family may not be as strong as it seemed, even though it is still brick it wasn’t the brick that it was thirty years ago. Scotch tape kept the wallpaper and toilet paper dispenser together, earlier in the book Phyllida express to Madeline that she was changing he old wallpaper at the that time in the book the condition of the wallpaper was in was withheld, so i assumed it would be in pretty good shape being that the Hannas’ were “well off”. Now looking at it maybe they wanted to change it because it was indeed like the hallways wallpaper, falling apart. Madeline pleaded with her mother not to change it even tho she was four years removed from the home as a regular occupant and had no plans of returning to her childhood bedroom after graduation. This shows Eugenides chaotic theme clearer than anything else, even though the wallpaper was falling apart (which we can associate with chaos) Madeline pleaded to keep it just the way it was(a problem) , opposing the changing of the wallpaper , even when the wallpaper did not directly effect her life anymore, which is chaotic in itself.

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Open-ended-ness

November 16th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · No Comments

Would the Frog have one the race if he wasn’t sabotaged ?

To answer this question i believe i might have to talk to mr.twain himself. If i was to do a search through our database i probably would start with searching other Twain stories and their underling meanings. I would need to know the importance of the frog in the story was it just a frog or was it a substitute for something else that twain was trying to refer to. I probably would search political problems or issues in the time that my short story was published in hopes of finding something in reference to what Twain was talking about in his story. A stretch? yes, but may be a place to start.

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Rumpelstiltskin

November 13th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · No Comments

Worth

Manikin trades ring and necklace for spun gold
Manikin trades child for spun gold
Happiness

King marries daughter
King rejoices
Queen learns true names

Sadness

Daughter put into room with task
Manikin splits into two
Queens incorrectly guesses names
Manikin returns for promised child

Cheating

Uses Manikan to spin gold
Uses messenger to find name

Looking at the story like this i believe all the columns are inter-related. What was given “worth” inevitable gave the daughter temporary happiness. The temporary happiness she was awarded could have possibly left her with permanent sadness, but she continued to cheat to gain more happiness. Growth is used in myth magnify the structure of the myth. As the story grows new dimensions are added to its structure but the structure is repeated. The miller gave his daughter to gain temporary happiness or acceptance from the king. Placed in a similar situation his daughter promises the same fate for an unborn child to gain this same acceptance from the very same king. The stories growth was directly affected by the stories structure.

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A Semiotician 2

November 2nd, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · No Comments

Step 1 – Analyze the Words in the poem, identify the significant words and formulate a meaning for them.
Step 2 – Identify the use of the words. How are they supposed to be read in the poem? Could other words work in the place of these words as well?
Step 3 – Now knowing what is provided analyze the poem from the information that is not provided and discuss what the poem is based on.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 65:
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
But sad mortality o’er-sways their power,
How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
Whose action is no stronger than a flower?
O, how shall summer’s honey breath hold out
Against the wreckful siege of battering days,
When rocks impregnable are not so stout,
Nor gates of steel so strong, but Time decays?
O fearful meditation! where, alack,
Shall Time’s best jewel from Time’s chest lie hid?
Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back?
Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid?
O, none, unless this miracle have might,
That in black ink my love may still shine bright.

1 – mortality- death or dying, stronger – ability to have strength , power – The ability or official capacity to exercise control.
2 – Mortality is used to speak about death, other words may have been able to been used but mortality gets the job done.
Stronger is used to measure the strength of the different things in the earth that are susceptible to being destroyed.
Power is used to show that many things that we may assimilate power with aren’t as powerful as we think.
3-The Poem is not discusses a different number of things for example it is not talking about birth or construction by using words like mortality and decays. From analyzing the content that we have in front of us we can see that the topic of the poem is based on what can withstand the test of time and to Shakespeare “black ink” or literature can.

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Annotated Paragraph

October 28th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · No Comments

Simon Wheeler backed me into a corner and blockaded me there with his chair , and then sat me down and reeled off the…

SEE:

http://eng170wqc.qwriting.qc.cuny.edu/?page_id=109&preview=true

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A Semiotician’s Shakespeare edition

October 27th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · 1 Comment

Step 1 – Analyze the Words in the poem, identify the significant words and formulate a meaning for them.
Step 2 – Identify the use of the words. How are they supposed to be read in the poem? Could other words work in the place of these words as well?
Step 3 – Analyze the poem from the information that is not provided and discuss what they poem is based on everything it is not.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 65:
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
But sad mortality o’er-sways their power,
How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
Whose action is no stronger than a flower?
O, how shall summer’s honey breath hold out
Against the wreckful siege of battering days,
When rocks impregnable are not so stout,
Nor gates of steel so strong, but Time decays?
O fearful meditation! where, alack,
Shall Time’s best jewel from Time’s chest lie hid?
Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back?
Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid?
O, none, unless this miracle have might,
That in black ink my love may still shine bright.

1 – mortality- death or dying, stronger – ability to have strength , power – The ability or official capacity to exercise control.
2 – Mortality is used to speak about death, other words may have been able to been used but mortality gets the job done.
Stronger is used to measure the strength of the different things in the earth that are susceptible to being destroyed.
Power is used to show that many things that we may assimilate power with aren’t as powerful as we think.
3-The Poem is not discusses a different number of things for example it is not talking about birth or construction by using words like mortality and decays. From analyzing the content that we have in front of us we can see that the topic of the poem is based on what can withstand the test of time and to Shakespeare “black ink” or literature can.

– To be a semiotician is a hard job but if i had to try i believe with the steps i have given they would first pull what they felt were the most important words, get the connotation and denotation of each and analyze each meaning of the words in respects to what they are not to determine what they are. After learning what the poem is not trying to say the semiotician can now sit and observe what it is trying to say based on what it is not. So since the poem is not talking about marriage or joy the poem has to be about death or destruction for example.

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HOVERING

October 19th, 2011 by Jerry in Uncategorized · 2 Comments

“Since a New Critic would not look at _______what the author is trying to say __________, it is important that we begin with ________Text________.” A new critic would analyze each and every word phrase and sentence in this poem to understand its literal meaning. In doing so they would have to define every word to understand the meaning of the whole. A new critic would be pleased with the fact that i defined every word and provided the literal meanings to them not the meanings that the author may have been referring to. Looking at these words by definition of the new critics really changes my perception of the poem, it throws it all off.

Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea

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